Britton Law, P.A.
It’s business and it’s personal call: 910-401-3356 ~or~ 888-811-9738 Representing the injured and local businesses since 1992

October 2016 Archives

Things to do before selling a business

Even the most successful entrepreneurs in North Carolina and around the country sometimes choose to sell their businesses. Some commercial ventures are sold because they have failed to live up to expectations, and some companies are disposed of because their owners have decided to pursue other opportunities or retire. Selling a business can be a complex and protracted process, but there are some steps that entrepreneurs can take to avoid many of the most common pitfalls.

Racial bias in wrongful death cases

North Carolina residents may be familiar with research indicating that the criminal justice system could be rife with racial bias. However, they may not know that women and minorities can also face significant obstacles when pursuing civil remedies following the death of a loved one. In wrongful death cases, the accident victim's lifetime earning potential is often taken into consideration when defendants draft settlement offers or juries determine damages. Some experts say that the data these calculations rely on is often heavily biased against people of color and women.

NHTSA seeks comments on semi truck underride guards

The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration is considering proposals that might improve underride guards on semi trucks in North Carolina and across the United States. Underride guards make trucks safer by preventing motor vehicle crashes in which passenger cars roll under a semi truck, often causing the destruction of the passenger compartment.

Elements to consider before buying a business

While there are many different types of businesses that a North Carolina investor might consider purchasing, there are some common factors related to those enterprises that should be considered before finalizing a deal to buy. An understanding of a company's finances, record, and potential allows people to make wise decisions about whether that business fits into their plans. Reasonable research is crucial for a reliable evaluation.

Collecting judgment debts in North Carolina

When North Carolina businesses are awarded money judgments, they then have to figure out how to collect on them. It is common for businesses to encounter difficulties with collecting judgment debts owed to them by debtors, and you must make certain that you follow the laws regarding debt collection tactics.

When cars, trucks and motorcyles share the road

When drivers in North Carolina share the roads with motorcyclists, it is sometimes assumed that the latter are responsible for their own safety entirely. In actual fact, drivers of all vehicles have a legal responsibility to exercise duty of care when sharing the roads with all other vehicles. Motorcylists face unique dangers due to being more unprotected while riding, but they do not have a greater legal responsibility than other drivers.

How to enter and exit a business in North Carolina

A successful business may be defined as one that can meet its expenses and provide a return on investment to its owners and shareholders. This return on investment should be enough to earn the continued commitment of those parties. Starting a successful business requires an individual to find an opportunity to solve a problem in the marketplace. This will be done through a quality business plan that allocates enough resources to execute that plan.

Things to keep in mind when selling a business

Successful North Carolina entrepreneurs are aware that working to achieve a prosperous business is not an easy task whether they started it from scratch or bought it as an established business. Likewise, trying to sell one may be just as difficult. Here are several tips for entrepreneurs who, for one reason or another, are making plans to sell their business.

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