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Courtesy and safer driving

| Feb 17, 2012 | Car Accidents |

I read in “Dear Abby” recently (Fayetteville Observer, February 16, 2012) about Motorists suggest ways to signal ‘I’m sorry.’ HOW TRUE!! The gist of the write up was a Mild-Mannered Motorist in Virginia asking for a hand signal to indicate “I’m Sorry” to fellow drivers when mistakes are made behind the wheel. Here are some of the suggestions from the column:

Faithful reader in Arkansas – mouth the words “I’m sorry” and make a peace sign.

Lorna, in the city – put hand to chest to accuse self and put hands in prayerful gesture to ask forgiveness.

Carol in Houston – hold hand up with your palm toward your face (“I’m ashamed of what I just did”)

Sign user in Old Lyme, Conn. – use American Sign Language – make a fist with your right hand, palm toward the body and place it over the area of your heart and move it in small circles – facial expression is important.

In the wrong in Maine – smack the forehead with a Homer Simpson “Doh!”

Pleasantly surprised in North Carolina – this one had a nice young lady follow them home and walk up their driveway to tell them she was sorry after pulling into their lane of travel and almost causing an accident.

So the next time you have an “oops moment” behind the wheel and someone is mad, think about these more courteous responses or think about one that works best for you. A courteous response will diffuse the anger and calm the nerves of everyone involved.

Usually the traffic incidents my firm and I become involved in are where the drivers have not been so fortunate to avoid a collision and people are hurt or even killed. More often than not, these collisions come about because people are not courteous to others when driving, they are distracted, and more commonly, lack of courtesy and distraction are coupled with speed.

I urge drivers in Fayetteville and surrounding communities to slow down, be courteous and pay attention. This should help you avoid the “oops moment” or worse.

 

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