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‘Black boxes’ may be required in vehicles to provide accident data

| Jan 12, 2013 | Car Accidents |

Police and other investigators must be thorough when making conclusions about serious and fatal car accidents in Fayetteville so that victims can recover compensation for damages that are caused by negligent drivers.

Crash victims who are struck by negligent drivers may even consider documenting the event — if they are capable of doing so — before police arrive at an accident scene in order to avoid missing any evidence that could later be used to help support a personal injury claim.

Although some accidents are more challenging to investigate than others, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is making a recommendation that could simplify crash investigations. The NHTSA recently announced that it wants to require all new vehicles to have data recorders installed. The so called “black boxes” will record pertinent crash details, including whether seat belts were used, the timing of airbag deployment, the force of an impact, vehicle speed, and whether an accelerator or brake was used by a driver during an accident.

The NHTSA says the proposal is for the safety of motorists and for the government to address manufacturing problems. It also claims the recording would only start when air bags are deployed or when a crash occurs. Some vehicles in the U.S. are already equipped with the technology, said the NHTSA, but the agency wants all vehicles manufactured after September 2014 to have the technology installed.

Those who have been victims of serious accidents that resulted in lengthy investigations may be pleased with the NHTSA’s recommendation. But not everyone agrees that all vehicles should come equipped with data recorders.

Insurance company AAA, which has 53 million members, is against the proposal, claiming the privacy of every driver should be protected. Also in favor of privacy protection is the Alliance of Automobile Manufacturers, which represents major U.S. automakers.

When Fayetteville motorists are injured in serious accidents, they should make sure authorities are notified about the incident so that the accident can be investigated. Victims may also consider consulting an attorney who can help them recover damages after a crash.

Source: Detroit News, “NHTSA: Data recorders ‘essential’ to auto safety,” David Shepardson, Dec. 19, 2012

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