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Hands-free communication dangers on the road

| Apr 14, 2016 | Car Accidents |

The advent of the smartphone has opened up many lines of communication for North Carolina residents, but some of these create dangers because of their misuse. One of the most serious issues is the use of one while driving, especially when sending text messages. While accidents have drawn significant levels of attention to the issue of negligent driving and serious distractions, some technologies that seem to be designed for safer driving actually don’t eliminate all danger of distraction. In fact, the presence of touchscreen systems and other hands-free tools in a vehicle may be more for convenience than for safety.

Even a simple conversation with a passenger can turn a driver’s attention away from the road, and a smartphone call conducted with hands-free equipment still engages the brain. While one’s eyes and hands may be free, the division of attention could increase the risk of a serious motor vehicle accident. Safety may be improved through legislation that totally prohibits the use of handheld equipment while driving, but a more comprehensive approach could provide for even better safety results on the nation’s roads.

While some types of distractions can be limited by a driver, others could be unplanned. For example, a sick child in the back seat of a vehicle could result in an unexpected situation that requires urgent attention. An experienced driver might be better equipped to deal with such issues. In the case of inexperienced drivers, there could be limits in place for the first few months of having a license to minimize the risk of incidents related to driving distractions.

People who believes that their car accident injuries are the result of distracted driving might discuss the situation with an attorney. Unlike drunk driving there is no test that can measure whether a motorist was distracted. However, eyewitness testimony and a review of the driver’s cellphone records might be fruitful.

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