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Getting ready to sell a business

| Mar 26, 2018 | Buying & Selling Businesses |

Business owners in North Carolina who want to sell their business may benefit from a period of preparation. Making the right choice as early as years before they sell may ensure that they are able to get the most money for their business.

One step business owners should take is to make sure that their business can be operated without their input or presence. Businesses that have owners take a hands-on approach to their operations, or who are the public face of their brand, may not be able to sell without being willing to remain with the company during a lengthy transition period.

This can be avoided by having the right systems and personnel in place and enabling them to run the business properly without having the business owners having to oversee or control every aspect of business operations. The value of the business may be maximized and make it more appealing to a larger number of prospective buyers.

Properly prepared financial statements are also necessary for preparing a business to be sold. Accountants and financial officers should be consulted to make sure that the statements are accurate and readily available to potential buyers. The majority of businesses are sold based on their cash flow value, or their earnings before taxes, amortization, interest and depreciations are factored in, which is why making wise financial decisions that can impact cash value a necessity. Forethought should be given to ways to enhance cash flow so that the value of the business is maximized during selling time.

Individuals who are interested in buying and selling businesses may safeguard their interests and rights by consulting with an attorney who practices business law. The attorney may oversee certain business transactions, such as the valuation of business assets. The attorney may negotiate and review terms for purchase agreements.

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