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Bosch develops pressurized gas anti-slip device for motorcycles

| May 24, 2018 | Motorcycle Accidents |

Due to the nature of their designs, motorcycles rarely have as many safety features as traditional automobiles. Auto parts manufacturer Bosch is attempting to change that by introducing an anti-slide device that promises to make riding in North Carolina safer than ever. This slide mitigation system uses a burst of pressurized gas to counteract a motorcycle that’s slipping too far in one direction. It takes advantage of a principle of Newtonian mechanics used by spaceships.

The construction of the pressurized gas device is supposed to be similar to the airbag inflation mechanism used in most modern automobiles. It is designed to provide a quick and powerful lateral force at the moment the motorcycle’s wheels begin to slip. Much like airbags, the device can only be used once before replacement will be required. This is likely to make the feature expensive.

If this new safety feature is commonly included in motorcycles, it may make riding a more popular form of transportation. Unfortunately, collisions with other vehicles account for a majority of rider deaths in the United States. This device doesn’t appear to have any ability to impact that fact. However, any effort to reduce the number of accidents that occur from slippery roadways and other hazards is good for riders.

When a motorcycle rider gets injured in an accident with another vehicle, they may be able to obtain compensation from the responsible party. This is important because motorcycle accidents can result in significant medical expenses, rehabilitation costs, property damage and lost wages. An attorney may be able to arrange a settlement out of court, but lawsuits and trials are sometimes necessary.

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