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Selling could be preferable to closing a business

| May 7, 2018 | Buying & Selling Businesses |

Business owners in North Carolina and throughout the country may feel as if they have lost the passion needed to run their companies. This could be because the economy is changing and they don’t believe that it is worth the effort to change with the times. In some cases, business owners may choose to just close their doors because they don’t believe the company could attract a buyer.

However, there could be a difference between what the owner thinks the business is worth and what an outside party believes that it is worth. Before deciding to close for good, those who run their companies could benefit from talking with someone who can put an estimate on its value. A professional appraiser or someone who has experience selling companies may be able to find potential buyers and reach out to them in a confidential manner.

A business owner may find that his or her belief that the company is dying could spread throughout the organization. Instead of trying to find new business, employees simply do their best to service the clients that the business already has until the doors are closed for good. By selling to another person or entity, it may offer the owner a chance to cash out while allowing the brand to be revitalized.

When selling a company, it could be possible to break the sale up into different pieces. For instance, business assets such as patents or other intellectual property could be sold to one party while physical assets are sold to another. However, it is also possible to maximize the company’s value by engaging in a single transaction. An attorney may be helpful in finding a buyer and facilitating the due diligence process before the transaction closing.

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